“Oh Baby – Now That’s a Scar!” Scar Release & C-Sections

Leave a Comment

According to the World Health Organization, cesarean (c-section), rates continue to rise around the world. The rate in Australia is 33% and in the United States of America, it is 32.2%, which works out to 1-in-3 women.

But no matter how well-trained the surgeon may be, there will be scar tissue formation after a C- Section.

c-section scar tissue

What You Need to Know About C-Sections, Scar Tissue & Your Health

Scar tissue needs to form to help the wound heal, but there is a tiny problem: adhesions Adhesions occur internally when the body undergoes severe trauma such as surgery, inflammation, or infection. Unfortunately, most doctors either fail to disclose or show concern in regard to adhesion formation, and a protocol to minimize it and the issues that can arise from them has never been established.

The most common incision for a C- Section is made horizontally (often called a bikini cut), which is just above the pubic bone. The incision is cut through the lower abdomen at the top of the pubic hair just over the hairline. The muscles of the stomach are not to be cut but they have pulled apart so that the doctor can gain access to the uterus. In an emergency cesarean the incision will most likely be a vertical incision (from the navel to the pubic area) which will allow faster delivery. The surgeon also pulls the bladder down to protect it during surgery. Scarring from the incision builds up underneath the incision as well as in the uterus. As the c-section scar starts to heal and the uterus reduces back adhesions form.

Scar tissue after a C Section is not preventable. Scar tissue is a fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue after an injury. While it contains the same materials as normal tissue, the quality of the scar tissue is inferior to that of the tissue it replaces. It is very important to understand that the scar that you can see is actually only the tip of the iceberg. All surgeries involve multiple layers of sutures and go much deeper than just the visible scar on the surface.

Another significant factor to be considered is the effect of adhesion formation on the internal organs.  The organs are supposed to slip and slide around each other. Organs need this movement in order to function properly. When adhesions are present, the sliding surfaces stick to each other and drag across one another causing tensional pulls. The resulting restrictions can cause a limited range of motion and pain in other areas of the body.

It can take up to two years after surgery or trauma to fully heal.  Pain and issues may not even surface until well after the Mom has “recovered” from the surgery. Years can pass and by then, the symptoms may not be associated with the scar.

Common Complaints & Issues Following a C-Section

Common complaints after a c-section can include the sensitivity of the scar itself and nerves being caught up in the scar tissue causing itching, hyper, or hyposensitivity.  This will make pants irritating or leaving the Mom unable to feel anything from the scar to the pubic bone.  Leaning over to pick up a baby can be painful. The tension pull from the scar may cause postural changes, that along with a decrease in the support of the back from the abdominal muscles could result in back pain. The scarring can cause the adjacent muscles to develop trigger points that refer pain to areas like the clitoris or urethra.

There can be issues with lower digestion such as irritable bowel syndrome or constipation and bloating.  Adhesions around the uterus, bladder, and fallopian tubes can lead to painful intercourse, frequent urination, and fertility challenges.

Let’s not forget the emotional issues that can arise as a direct result of the scar.  There is the selfconsciousness about the appearance of the scar. Some women will not touch the scar and surrounding area.  A simple pull or pressure on the scar can cause a continual minor or a sudden major PTSD reaction.  Lack of sleep and mental stress from chronic pain that doctors do not acknowledge and family members do not understand can be detrimental.

“I was fortunate enough to have a massage with Marjorie in Sydney, Australia on her recent visit. I was astonished by the immediate results and by Marjorie’s open, giving attitude. Post massage benefits included greater energy, improved posture, a huge sense of release, and opening to my abdomen which had felt frozen after surgery. It was such a relief. Emotionally I felt noticeably stronger after the treatment.”  Deborah S, Australia

C-Section Scar Tissue Impacts on Your Health

Scar tissue can have an adverse effect on every one of the body’s systems.  They are interconnected and encased by the fascia and the smallest of restrictions can cause problems.  The good news is that there is much that can be done to minimize and correct the issues.

C-section scarring can be improved or corrected altogether by releasing the scar tissue and proper therapeutic rehab (every expecting mother needs to be trained in pelvic floor exercises for both pre & post pregnancy).  As the scar tissue is released layer by layer, and fibers encouraged to lay down in the proper alignment, the softer it becomes and function can be restored to the tissue surrounding the area. This reduces tensional pulls and reduces the adhesions. The tissue needs to be released in all directions, proper circulation (lymph included), range of motion restored and body mechanics re-established.

I found Marjorie after doing a search for a solution to my c- section scar and pain. She is a miracle worker. After just one session my scars have flattened significantly and the color has improved. She has helped with my back pain and sleeping problems. She is also very personable, caring, and easy to talk to. I highly recommend her to anyone that has scars, surgery, or any kind of pain.”

Jennifer G, USA

What to do About C-Section Scars

The body needs time to heal, so for the best results, light therapy such as myofascial release and lymphatic massage can start right after the surgery.  Gentle range of motion stretching and proper body mechanics (how to feed, pick up and carry the baby etc) should be done in accordance with the mother’s ability and healing.

After 12 weeks the tissue can be released via the S.T.R.A.I.T Method™ or Scar Tissue Release and Integrated Therapies a three-dimensional, fascial-release system that works to minimize scar-tissue development and the subsequent physiological restrictions. As tissue is forever remodeling there is no time limit to working on scars.  A difference can be made and balance restored no matter how old the scar is.

Learn more about how scar tissue release massage therapy can help with your c-section scar tissue.

》A B O U T   M A R J O R I E   B R O O K

marjorie brook lmt author headshotMarjorie Brook, LMT is a massage therapist, author and international educator. For over 21 years, she has specialized in scar tissue release and massage therapy. She works from the fundamental belief that your body is intuitively aligned with the thoughts you think, the emotions that you feel and the things that you do. She founded Brooks Seminars in 2007 after working as a decade as a nationally recognized massage therapist with a private practice on Long Island. She is the creator of the Scar Tissue Release and Integrated Therapies (S.T.R.A.I.T Method™) and offers continuing education courses on this method all over the world. Her articles have appeared in magazines such as Massage Today, American Fitness and Massage World. She’s approved by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, the Massage Therapy Association of Alberta and the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia.

RESOURCES

  1. Williams Obstetrics Twenty-Second Ed. Cunningham, F. Gary, et al, Ch. 25.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  cdc.gov
  3. World Health Organization 

All Parts are Equal or are They?

Leave a Comment

When a person has back surgery or has had a limb amputated, it is standard for them to go through a rehabilitation process, including physical therapy or massage therapy to be prescribed. However, if a woman has breast surgery, rehabilitation (massage or physical therapy) is not automatically ordered and often not even suggested.
When a woman chooses to have her breasts removed, reconstructed, increased or reduced, it’s important that she understands not only the benefits of the procedures, but the risks as well. Chronic pain and postural problems can appear years later if rehabilitation is not completed following breast surgery.

Breasts are composed of mammary glands, connective tissue, blood vessels, nerves, and lymph vessels. Breast tissue can extend from the border of the breastbone near the center of the chest all the way to the armpit, and overlies the second to sixth ribs. The breast has an axillary tail, which is a tail of tissue that extends up into the armpit region. The breast lies on top of the pectoralis major muscle.
Breast tissue is part of the fascial web of connective tissue, which runs continuously throughout the body from head to foot and superficial to deep without interruption. Any alteration, even the slightest damage to the fascial network has major ramifications.
The body’s balance and symmetry can be significantly altered after a mastectomy, augmentation or reduction. This is something many women aren’t informed of or prepared for. Scar tissue is also a very important fact which women need to be aware of and prepared for. Unpredictable development of scar tissue is quite common after any surgery and can have long-term effects on the body.
Early intervention following breast surgery by a massage or physical therapist can play a pivotal roll in helping women heal and regain full function.
After mastectomy surgery a woman may experience tightness or pulling originating from her incision, which spreads across her body. This is caused by scar tissue, which is the body’s way of healing from surgery. The result can be very dense tissue under the incision, which is painful and which can restrict the arm’s range of motion (ROM). The restricted ROM puts women at risk for a painful condition known as frozen shoulder. Scars can range in size after a breast-conserving lumpectomy or a mastectomy procedure that removes the entire breast. Either way, most breast cancer patients are left with some sort of surgical scar as a by-product of their quest to heal.
In order to rebuild the breast, tissue is taken from another area of the body. It can be taken from several different locations. One host area is the Latissimus Dorsi. In the picture below you can see how much of the body is affected by this location.
Unknown
The TUG procedure uses skin and fat from the inner portion of the upper thigh; the incision scar will be hidden near the crease of the groin. The flap is named for the transverse upper gracilis muscle to which the skin and fat are connected. Muscle may be removed as part of the TUG flap.

Unknown-1
Radiation treatment for Breast Cancer has its own list of complications. This type of therapy not only changes tissue characteristics by making it more susceptible to breakdown, it continues to make tissues tighter for 2 to 5 years following treatment.

images
It can also lead to:
Skin tightening;
Limited arm and shoulder mobility;
Chest expansion limitations;
Restrictions in and around the area of treatment.
Breast reduction surgery is still largely considered to be a cosmetic surgical procedure. However, it is most often performed to relieve significant physical and emotional problems resulting from overly large and/or heavy breasts. Surgeries are classified as “cosmetic” if it is an elective procedure that insurance does not cover. If it is a procedure that is restoring form or function, it’s referred to as “reconstructive”. Reconstructive procedures are often covered by insurance. The same procedure may be classified as cosmetic or reconstructive depending on how it impacts an individual. Public opinion still sees it as cosmetic but 9.5 times out of ten it is being performed to reduce pain or to alter the overall structure.

 

According to the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 112,964 breast reductions were performed in 2011. Breast reduction surgery leaves permanent scarring.

Unknown-2

The operation using the anchor technique leaves three scars:
One around the nipple (areola);
One from the nipple to the crease below the breast (this is the worst scar as it takes the most tension);
One from the breast bone to the armpit along the crease below the breast.

The severity of scarring largely depends on the individual. Most women are completely unaware of how the scar tissue is affecting them.

 

images-4

images-2
Kelly Bowers, a massage therapist from Washington, DC states:
“I had breast reduction surgery in 1992. By 2012 I rarely thought of it and certainly didn’t think the scars were an issue any more. They were barely visible! Then I had scar release work. I was stunned at how far I felt the effects of the work. I felt it from my shoulder to my hip! I’m delighted I had a chance to experience this work and finally take care of these scars as they deserved to be taken care of.”
The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery also reported that breast augmentation is the most popular surgical cosmetic procedure for women, with more than 316,000 procedures performed in 2011. Yes, augmentation is an elective cosmetic surgery, but it is still a surgery that alters the body. Rehabilitative therapy is necessary after any surgery.

Women who have breast augmentation frequently experience:
Limited upper extremity mobility (range of motion);
Arm weakness and swelling;
Fatigue;
Shoulder dysfunction;
Back pain;
Chest pain.

 
Scar tissue can occur at any time after the augmentation has been performed, not just within the first few months. Capsular contracture is the term used to describe scar tissue that can form around breast implants which may cause the breasts to harden, look or feel different, and may cause some discomfort from the tightening of the capsule. Capsular contracture is an unpredictable complication, but it is also the most common complication following breast augmentation.

 
Scars left by breast augmentation surgery are usually hidden in the crease beneath the breast (inframammary fold incision), around the nipple (peri-areolar incision) or in the armpit (transaxillary incision). Rehabilitation/therapy and physical activity are integral to recovery and to reduce post-breast surgery side effects such as:
Scar tissue/soft tissue immobility;
Flexibility limitations;
Limited range of motion;
Decreased strength.

 
Even if a woman does not actually develop pain or limited function directly after the procedure, at some point pain and disability will become present if scar tissue is not addressed in a timely and proper fashion.

Words can cut like a knife – leaving deep wounds and scars….

Leave a Comment

At this past weekend’s Scar Tissue Release, class we were fortunate to have a Registered Nurse volunteer as the demonstration client. She was incredibly generous with her feedback on what she was experiencing during the treatment and answered questions for the students. Two of her scars were from 18 & 20 year old C-sections, respectively. As she told us the stories of the surgeries, the conversation turned to the trauma, both physical and emotional that the events caused.

Apparently, as the surgeons were preparing to cut her open, they were busy discussing their golf game. The surgerical nurse stopped the banter and gave them a what for. Just think how you would feel at that moment, laying on a cold operating table, about to have your abdomen sliced open in order to bring your child into the world, being denied the experience of natural birth. As she told her story, you could see that even after 18 years, she was still very emotional about it.

Since she is a cardiac recovery nurse, I took the opportunity to emphasize a few points I had made during the class lecture. Specifically how “donor” sites, areas where skin or veins are removed in order to repair another injured area of the body, are ignored once they have healed. When I asked her opinion on this matter, she agreed whole heartedly that no further thought is given to these areas; however, she referred to these areas as the “harvest” site.

Everyone in the room took a breath. I knew what they were all thinking as I looked at each of them. The Nurse looked around puzzled, and I explained to her that I refer to the area as a “donor” site. She thought about it for a minute and shook her head. “I never even thought of that, but you are totally right…how horrible.”

How we–doctors, therapists, trainers, family and friends–refer to someone, something, or situation sets the intent. This, in turn, dictates how we regard, and therefore treat or not treat. Most often when we think of harvesting an organ, we think of cadavers. So of course an area that was used for “harvest” does not need further care or concern.

The next day, one of my current clients was among the volunteers for the student practice session. He had burns over 2/3rds of his body from a car fire. He is one of the most balanced and centered people I know. He shared two very important points with the group. First, that he never even considered that there was any kind of restriction, much less a need for therapy, on the areas where they took skin for grafts and that he was blown away by the resulting treatment’s effects all of the areas, grafted and donor. Second, while still recovering in the hospital, a representative of a burn group came by to help him understand and deal with how his life was about to change. “How everyone was going to stare at him and treat him differently…” You can imagine the rest of the conversation. He could not believe this person was there to help him and fortunately he choose not to listen to her doom-and-gloom speech.

I had another client, a massage therapist, who, while filling out her intake form, said to me in regard to the question asking her to list all surgeries, “Well, I did have a C-Section, but I do not really consider that a surgery.” Unbelievably, she was not the first woman to make this statement to me either.

As health care providers we must take care of how we phrase our words, and just as or more importantly, we need pay attention to and assist in altering how our clients refer to themselves. The first step on the road to healing is understanding and awareness.

The children are our future…So how about we pay attention now!

Leave a Comment

I received a call the other day from a fellow Massage Therapist. He was
referring one of his clients, a 15 year old male athlete ( lacrosse
goalie and football linebacker) with severe pain in his right knee. The boy’s coach told his mother he needed an MRI and that he most likely tore
something. My friend did not agree and wanted to see what I
thought and if Integrated Therapeutic Stretching would help. He had tryouts in two days and they were concerned about injury.

According to the client he only felt the pain when he was crouching in goalie position. I had him do it for me. He had all of his wait on the outside of his feet which were not wide enough apart to support his weight properly.

I ran him through some quick range of motion & muscle tests as he lay on the table with no resulting pain but revealed very limited ROM throughout the boy’s lower body. As we started to stretch it was quickly discovered that his left glutes were locked up. Hip rotators on both sides were in as bad a shape. IT Band and hamstrings were at 60% ROM and his quadriceps were down to 45%. This is 15 years old folks!

It is terrifying to see the physical shape of children today. Either they are overweight and under exercised or they are over worked, participating in multiple sports where proper strength and flexibility training is nonexistent.

Sports injuries are on the rise in children and teenagers. Each year more than 3.5 million sports-related injuries requiring medical treatment occur in children under age 15. Today, as more and more children and adolescents participate in the same sport year-round, many young athletes are developing overuse injuries. In fact, overuse is responsible for about half of the sports injuries that happen to middle and high school aged students.

We worked together through each stretch, showing him how his body is supposed to move utilizing body proper form and mechanics. He was very eager to learn as was his mother. I assisted and guided him through the stretches focusing especially the ones which really opened his restrictions. Both he and his mother were surprised at how tight he was in the beginning and at speed with which he loosened up.

Now as we were working I observed a deep scar about 1inch in length on his left knee which he claimed was “no big deal” and said it was over a year old. His mother chimed in “the bad one was on his foot”. Three years prior he flayed his right foot open on a fence. There was a huge c shaped scar on the sole of his foot which upon palpation showed to have spread and attached into the arch.

I asked if he wanted to see something cool and then I proceeded to release the scar on his knee. When I asked him to bend his knee his eyes opened wide and said “That’s Sick!”. His knee flexion had increased by 20% . Next with his mother’s permission I went to work on his foot. When I was done I had him stand up. He laughed out loud and said “No Way! Thats Totally Sick! I can feel the bottom of my foot”. His mother , shocked at his reaction said ” I didn’t know you couldn’t feel your foot?!” “Neither did I” was his reply.

We followed this up with gait re-education and proper mechanics required for his respective sports positions (i.e. crouching and squatting). While he still had some minor pain he could see how adjusting his stance took the pressure off his knee. After having him go through the stretches once more I recommend to the mother that if the pain comes back or increases then she should indeed seek their doctor’s advice.

The mother was shocked at how much the scars were affecting her son. I explained to her that scars and adhesions are generally overlooked by health professionals because the extent of physiological affects they can have on the body have never really been acknowledged. The slightest restriction from falling off his bike at 4 could alter how he grows and have major repercussions from one end of his body to the other.

Four days later the duo returned, the tryouts went great and when asked about his knee he said “it still hurts every now and then but whenever I felt it start I shifted around until I felt right and the pain stopped.” I asked if had been stretching and he say before and after the games. (In the four days since I had seen him he had two lacrosse matches and two days of football tryouts). He was also very excited for more scar therapy “It was so weird but I could feel my foot moving better as I played!” His mother than asked if I had any extra time to look at her two scars that have been driving her crazy for years.

During the course of my career I’ve treated many patients whose problems could be traced back to a scar they had forgotten they even had. While not every scar presents a problem, very often they do. Doctors, along with basically everyone else, tend to ignore scar tissue from surgery and accidents especially in children.

Today children are playing more and more sports driven by the need of scholarships and future fame. It is time we start to pay attention to the adverse affects of training and playing so hard so young. We need to make sure that the fall off the bike or the cut from climbing over the fence does not lead to issues later on.

Do’s & Don’ts of Healing Scar Tissue-Tip #1

Leave a Comment

Essential Oils or Vitamin E for Healing Scar Tissue

Whether it’s acne pockmarks, or the legacy of a burn, wound, or surgery, few of us like scars on our skin. And there’s no shortage of remedies that claim to make scars smaller, thinner, less noticeable and heal faster. From natural at-home remedies to mass-produced and mass-marketed products, we are flooded with options that claim to help with scars. In this series of blogs, I will shed some light on natural and medical scar treatments.

What Should You Do to Heal Scar Tissue?

Do:

download (5)Use Lavender essential oil to treat scars especially burns. Lavender is one of the best all-round essential oil, according to Shirley Price in her book “Aromatherapy for Women.” Lavender oil is gentle, inexpensive, and effective. Lavender essential oil can be used to treat acne, scars, and most skin conditions; it can be applied directly to the skin, in small quantities.

Lavender essential oil is a very effective antiseptic, antibacterial, and antimicrobial that reduces pain, itching and promotes rapid healing. In addition, lavender reduces scarring. When lavender oil is applied to a burn from the onset, the burn may heal with no scarring at all. (For larger burns, put lavender oil onto a gauze or cloth and apply to the burn every few hours.)

How to use it?
• Apply several drops (2-4) on location several times a day
• Directly inhale, diffuse, or
• May be used as a dietary supplement

Safety Considerations With Lavender Essential Oil

Lavender essential oil can sting a little when a wound is still fresh, but once it’s scabbed over and has started healing, lavender essential oil, applied topically, can help minimize scarring while it heals.

Lavender has a relaxation property, often used to fragrance products for bedtime, like lotions and satchels for bedrooms. WebMD warns that lavender essential oil can depress the central nervous system and cause drowsiness and sleepiness (especially good when used properly to treat insomnia and induce relaxation but dangerous when used for other properties and healing in which sleepiness is not the desired effect). You shouldn’t drive or do other dangerous things until you know how lavender will work for you.

rene-maurice-gattefosse
History fact: A French scientist, René Gattefossé, was severely burned in a laboratory accident and immersed his hand in a vat of Lavender for two weeks. Gattefossé found that Lavender oil promoted tissue regeneration quickly and healed the wound with no scarring!

Don’t:

One of the most popular treatments for scarring is vitamin E.
But will vitamin E really help to improve your scar?

can_vitamin_e_h_photoVitamin E, or tocopherol, is a fat-soluble antioxidant. It’s found in capsule or liquid form at drugstores, grocery stores, health food stores, and online. The so called effective remedy consists of opening vitamin E capsules and applying the content on the scar. But this topical use of vitamin E does not result in scar healing.

Vitamin E has been shown to penetrate layers of the skin and reduce the formation of free radicals which can interfere with healing. Vitamin E also influences the production of collagen, a structural protein partially responsible for the strength and elasticity of the skin. Although many people apply vitamin E oil to their skin to minimize scars and it’s sometimes recommended by physicians after skin surgery, there’s very little evidence that shows it helps.

Vitamin E Research :
Current research does not support vitamin E oil to reduce scar formation.

A study on the effects of topical vitamin E on the cosmetic appearance of scars at the University of Miami that there is no benefit to the cosmetic outcome of scars by applying vitamin E after skin surgery and that the application of topical vitamin E may actually be detrimental to the cosmetic appearance of a scar. In 90% of the cases in this study, topical vitamin E either had no effect on or actually worsened, the cosmetic appearance of scars. Of the patients studied, 33% developed contact dermatitis to the vitamin E. Therefore it was concluded that the use of topical vitamin E on surgical wounds should be discouraged.

Research by K.C. Wan and J.H. Evans at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, published in 1999 issue of “Free Radical Biology & Medicine,” found higher amounts of free radicals in hypertrophic scars, which become thicker, redder, and more elevated than regular scars. Another study by T.L. Khoo at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, published in a 2010 issue of the “Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery,” concluded that tocotrienols, a vitamin E subfamily, made no significant improvement in scar parameters. Also, a study conducted by Morganroth, Wilmot, and Miller in Philadelphia for a 2009 issue of the “Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology” determined that scar products containing vitamin E oil did not support usage for the reduction of postoperative scar formation.

Be on the lookout:

For specific ingredients found in commercial wound ointments and dressings.

Listed below are just a few ingredients present in store-bought wound products. Most of these products produce skin irritation, sensitization, and are linked to allergies, cancer, and/or immune suppression.

Here they are:
• Petrolatum
• Mineral Oil
• Propylene Glycol
• Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT)images (19)
• Benzalkonium Chloride
• Yellow #5; FD&C Blue #1
• DMDM Hydantoin

Even many of the natural ointments contain some of these ingredients. Make sure to read the labels and please, test the area for allergic reactions before applying anything to your skin!

Hope this helps with your scar healing.

Check out the second post of the series: Do’s and Don’t’s of Healing Scar Tissue – Tip #2

》A B O U T   M A R J O R I E   B R O O K

marjorie brook lmt author headshotMarjorie Brook, LMT is a massage therapist, author and international educator. For over 21 years, she has specialized in scar tissue release and massage therapy. She works from the fundamental belief that your body is intuitively aligned with the thoughts you think, the emotions that you feel and the things that you do. She founded Brooks Seminars in 2007 after working as a decade as a nationally recognized massage therapist with a private practice on Long Island. She is the creator of the Scar Tissue Release and Integrated Therapies (S.T.R.A.I.T Method™) and offers continuing education courses on this method all over the world. Her articles have appeared in magazines such as Massage Today, American Fitness and Massage World. She’s approved by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, the Massage Therapy Association of Alberta and the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia.