Do’s & Don’ts of Healing Scar Tissue-Tip #1.

Leave a Comment

Whether it’s acne pock marks, or the legacy of a burn, wound or surgery, few of us like scars on our skin. And there’s no shortage of remedies that claim to make scars smaller, thinner, less noticeable and heal faster. In this series of blogs I will attempt to shed some light about natural and medical scar treatments.

Do:

download (5)Use Lavender essential oil to treat scars especially burns. Lavender is one of the best all-round essential oil, according to Shirley Price in her book “Aromatherapy for Women.” Lavender oil is gentle, inexpensive and effective. Lavender essential oil can be used to treat acne, scars and most skin conditions; it can be applied direct to the skin, in small quantities.

Lavender essential oil is a very effective antiseptic, antibacterial and antimicrobial that reduces pain, itching and promotes rapid healing. In addition, lavender reduces scarring. When lavender oil is applied to a burn from the onset, the burn may heal with no scarring at all. (For larger burns, put lavender oil onto a gauze or cloth and apply to the burn every few hours.)

How to use it?
• Apply several drops (2-4) on location several times a day
• Directly inhale, diffuse, or
• May be used as a dietary supplement

Safety Considerations With Lavender Essential Oil

Lavender essential oil can sting a little when a wound is still fresh, but once it’s scabbed over and has started healing, lavender essential oil, applied topically, can help minimize scarring while it heals.

Lavender has a relaxation property, often used to fragrance products for bedtime, like lotions and satchels for bedrooms. WebMD warns that lavender essential oil can depress the central nervous system and cause drowsiness and sleepiness (especially good when used properly to treat insomnia and induce relaxation but dangerous when used for other properties and healing in which sleepiness is not a desired effect). You shouldn’t drive or do other dangerous things until you know how lavender will work for you.

rene-maurice-gattefosse
History fact: A French scientist, René Gattefossé, was severely burned in a laboratory accident and immersed his hand in a vat of Lavender for two weeks. Gattefossé found that Lavender oil promoted tissue regeneration quickly and healed the wound with no scarring!

Don’t:

One of the most popular treatments for scarring is vitamin E.
But will vitamin E really help to improve your scar?

can_vitamin_e_h_photoVitamin E, or tocopherol, is a fat-soluble antioxidant. It’s found in capsule or liquid form at drugstores, grocery stores, health food stores, and online. The so called effective remedy consists of opening vitamin E capsules and applying the content on the scar. But this topical use of vitamin E does not result in scar healing. Vitamin E has been shown to penetrate layers of the skin and reduce the formation of free radicals which can interfere with healing. Vitamin E also influences the production of collagen, a structural protein partially responsible for the strength and elasticity of skin. Although many people apply vitamin E oil to their skin to minimize scars and it’s sometimes recommended by physicians after skin surgery, there’s very little evidence that shows it helps.

Vitamin E Research :
Current research does not support vitamin E oil to reduce scar formation.

A study on the effects of topical vitamin E on the cosmetic appearance of scars at the University of Miami that there is no benefit to the cosmetic outcome of scars by applying vitamin E after skin surgery and that the application of topical vitamin E may actually be detrimental to the cosmetic appearance of a scar. In 90% of the cases in this study, topical vitamin E either had no effect on, or actually worsened, the cosmetic appearance of scars. Of the patients studied, 33% developed a contact dermatitis to the vitamin E. Therefore it was concluded that use of topical vitamin E on surgical wounds should be discouraged.

Research by K.C. Wan and J.H. Evans at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, published in 1999 issue of “Free Radical Biology & Medicine,” found higher amounts of free radicals in hypertrophic scars, which become thicker, redder and more elevated than regular scars. Another study by T.L. Khoo at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, published in a 2010 issue of the “Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery,” concluded that tocotrienols, a vitamin E subfamily, made no significant improvement in scar parameters. Also, a study conducted by Morganroth, Wilmot and Miller in Philadelphia for a 2009 issue of the “Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology” determined that scar products containing vitamin E oil did not support usage for the reduction of postoperative scar formation.

Be on the lookout:
For specific ingredients found in commercial wound ointments and dressings.
Listed below are just a few ingredients present in store bought wound products. Most of these products produce skin irritation, sensitization, and are linked to allergies, cancer and/or immune suppression. Here they are:
• Petrolatum
• Mineral Oil
• Propylene Glycol
• Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT)images (19)
• Benzalkonium Chloride
• Yellow #5; FD&C Blue #1
• DMDM Hydantoin

Even many of the natural ointments contain some of these ingredients. Make sure to read the labels and please, test the area for allergic reactions before applying anything to your skin!

Mandatory Gratuities -Oxymoron

Leave a Comment

images (18)I was settling up with a new client when she asked “And what is the recommended gratuity?” I explained that “while I appreciate the thought it was not necessary”. She was very surprised and commented that the last few places (both spa and private practice) she went to had a mandatory gratuity policy. This really drives me crazy.

The definition of mandatory is: containing or constituting a command: obligatory
The definition of a gratuity is: something given voluntarily or beyond obligation usually for some service; generally in the form of a tip.

A gratuity is just that. When a person is happy with a service that has been provided for them and wish to show their appreciation. So, would someone please explain to me how demanding a client be grateful for the service they have paid you to perform, whether or not they actually did appreciate it, acceptable? Especially to the point of requiring they give more money on top of the already established fee?

Now I am not saying one should not accept a gratuity. I believe it is a personal choice. It is up to the individual as to whether or not they wish offer a gratuity and to accept one. As I mentioned earlier I always tell my clients it is not necessary but if they insist I will accept because of what the offering means to them. I usually put the tip in a draw and then make a donation somewhere down the road with it, my way of paying it forward. But, again this is my choice there is nothing wrong if another therapist decided to keep the offering. The therapist performed a service to the best of his/her ability and were rewarded for the effort.

I know that there are a few points of view out there in regard to the Massage Profession. The first is we are a service industry and that there is no reason why we should not accept tips. The second is that we are healthcare providers, the same as doctors and physical therapists, and it is unprofessional to accept tips. We are all in service in one way or another from the doctor to therapist to contractors to the waitress at the local dinner. It is always uplifting when one is complimented or thanked for a job well done. Where the distinction falls as to who should or should not receive a gratuity it is commonly left up to proper social etiquette. What most fail to see is that if we follow proper etiquette everyone receives a tip. – hospitals are giving grants, doctors receive the fruit basket or bottle of wine at the holidays. We leave holiday bonuses for the mailman and the garbage collectors. We leave the tip on the table at the end of the meal for the waitress. How much we give, if at all, is a personal choice. While society likes to comment on the end results it is no one else’s business and it is certainly no one else right to demand that their way of doing something be adhered to.

There is also the unwarranted distinction of whether or not the therapist is working for themselves or on staff at a spa. In other words, it is required to tip the therapist at a spa because the house is taking a cut and the therapist makes less. First off the therapist chooses to work for the spa and that alone does not make them worthy of a gratuity. If the client is really pleased with the service then by all means have at it, however, the client should not be required to do so. It is a bad habit of some spas to make gratuities mandatory to make up for the low wages they pay the therapist. So in other words, the Spa is demanding the client not only pay them for the service but also share the cost of paying the salary of the therapist as well. If a spa wants quality staff then pay a decent wage.

A client once told me how she went to a spa where the staff was rude, she waited 20 minutes past her appointment time and the massage was just o.k. In spite of all of this when she paid for her treatment, she included a tip as etiquette required and she was promptly informed out loud “that is not how we do it here your tip is not enough”. She felt so embarrassed she gave them more money and fled. Granted this is not the norm but what is the incentive, for those who need one, to do a good job if they are already guaranteed a bonus no matter how they perform?

As far as not tipping a therapist in private practice because all of the money goes to them- well please, the therapist is paying their own overhead and has bills like everyone else. Either way if the client is pleased with the massage there is no reason not to express their appreciation and it is up to the therapist to choose to accept it. That’s all I am saying.

Wide Band Narrow View

Leave a Comment

A_HAD_1p_P36Should we stretch? Does it help or does it cause harm? This is a very popular debate. One that usually ends in “Well… there is no evidence that proves it is good… but everyone does feels better afterwards.” or “It is a waste of time that can only lead to loss of strength.”

When we think about stretching we tend to think only about the muscles and static holds. These narrow views are what gives stretching a bad reputation and where all of the misunderstandings occur. We should be stretching the whole body, which is primarily made of fascia, in line with the way it was designed to move, dynamically.

For example let’s look at the knee. Usually when there is an knee issue most look to stretching the Quadriceps or Hamstrings muscles. body_worlds_knee When the IT Band comes to the knee joint it binds into a large network of connective tissue or Fascia. This fascial network comes across the front of the knee depending on the direction of force and it connects down into the shins. The IT Band fascially connects into the Peronals & Tibialis Anterior. The knee cap is embedded in fascia. When we have Knee injuries such as patella tracking, meniscus tears, ACL we often focus our view on the Hamstrings and Quadriceps addressing only half the possibilities of causation. Perhaps the fasica is inflamed. A common complaints of knee pain is a sweeping type of pain across the knee and under the knee cap. For it to be sweeping across it must be the fibrous attachments across the knee. This is not the type of pain a Quadricep or Hamstring would be causing.

So by opening up our point of view to encompass all of tissues involved, while recognizing the patterns in which it is connected and functions leads to a productive pain reducing, fascial lengthening, muscle educating and recovering stretching session.